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Body-building with Fritz

By Magnus Angus

Magnus Angus discusses achieving neater, tighter, more controlled tying with chenile


1. The
1. The
2. The
2. The
3. The core exposed ready to be tied in.
3. The core exposed ready to be tied in.
4. Stroking the fibres back with each turn around the hook-shank allows me to make touching turns
4. Stroking the fibres back with each turn around the hook-shank allows me to make touching turns
5.
5.

When you handle a chenille stroke the fibres first in one direction then then other. The pile on many chenille tends to lie flat when stroked in one direction and sticks up if brushed in the other – fly tyers will be familiar with this sort of thing from handling hackles and furs.

For neater, tighter, more controlled tying, find which way the fibres want to lay flat or at least flatter and strip a little of the core at that end. Then handle the chenille like a hackle, stroking the fibres back as you wrap.

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